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Wednesday, April 17, 2013

Sharon Srock and Terri: Women of Valley View

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

SHARON SROCK lives with her husband, Larry, and two dogs in Rural Oklahoma. She is a mother, grandmother, and Sunday School teacher. Sharon has one and three-quarters jobs and writes in her spare time. Her favorite hobby is traveling with her grandchildren. She is a member of the ACFW and currently serves as treasurer for her local chapter. Sharon’s debut novel, The Women of Valley View: Callie released in October 2012. The second in the series, The Women of Valley View: Terri releases in April 2013.

Connect with her here:
Blog - http://womenofvalleyview.blogspot.com/
Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/SharonSrock
Twitter - http://twitter.com/SharonSrock
Goodreads - http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/6448789.Sharon_Srock

TERRI: WOMEN OF VALLEY VIEW
by Sharon Srock
Published by HarbourLight Books

ABOUT THE BOOK

Despite a bustling day care center and a new foster child, Terri Hayes hungers for a family of her own. Then a plumbing mishap leaves her homeless and questioning God’s plan. Steve Evans’s gracious offer of his basement apartment as a temporary solution is an answered prayer.

Steve is a successful writer and a good father, but Terri is horrified when Steve’s book research leads him to a harsh confrontation with the parents of her foster child. She needs to distance herself from Steve, but her efforts fall short as his two scheming daughters plot to make Terri their new stepmother.

Will harsh words and sneaky plans drive Kelsey’s family further apart and put a wedge between Terri and Steve? Or does God have another plan in store?

Readers, buy your copy of Terri: Women of Valley View today!

Download a PDF file for an introduction to the women in Sharon's novels.

AND NOW A WORD FROM OUR FEATURE AUTHOR

ARE YOU WITH US?

I won’t share the name my favorite fiction author, I’ll only say that I’ve read everything she’s ever published and lived in awe of her ability to crank out story after story, on average 3-4 a year.

About five years ago--before God shoved me, kicking and screaming, into my own fiction writing abyss—I saw a video interview with this writer. The camera never left her face as the questions were asked and answered. I remember watching and thinking…what is she doing?

She was talking, she was answering questions, but her words were almost hesitant and her eyes seemed focused someplace else. Every once in a while her head would tilt or jerk as if she heard something from a distance. If you’ve ever watched Star Trek, The Next Generation, picture Data. Worst case…I thought she was high on some really good drugs…best case…incredibly insecure and camera shy.

But now I know it wasn’t either of those two extremes. It was the voices.

She wasn’t high or shy, she was carrying on two conversations, maybe three, at the same time. One with the person doing the interview, the others with the people living inside her head.

Before you call the men in the little white jackets with the really good drugs in their pockets, let me explain.

Writing fiction will take you to a whole, new level of crazy. Think about it in the terms of your own life. Imagine living with a group of people for two or three years straight, without a vacation. Eat with them, sleep with them, worry about them, pray for them, kill them, bring them back to life, argue with them, loose arguments with them…Are you getting the picture?

Welcome to my world. Sometimes I think romance writers must have the best of this craziness. Their stories generally revolve around two characters, so maybe they’re only living with two extra voices in their head. I have a whole community. And they NEVER shut up. They lay in wait for my eyes pop open in the morning. They whisper around my prayer time. They go to work with me. I worry about their problems. I find myself praying for the situations I put them in. They go to bed with me at night. If I could blame the twenty pounds I've gained since I started writing on them, I would. How does the excuse, I’m eating for thirty, sound?

Now I understand the distracted look in the eyes of my favorite author. I’ve seen it staring at me from my own mirror. She wasn’t high or shy, she was listening to the voices and plotting the next story, for which I must thank her. So, if I seem a little distracted or zoned out at times, please forgive me. It seems to be part of the process.

Reader Questions: Do you have an imaginary friend?

* * * * *

Thank you, Sharon, for sharing with us today.

ENTRY RULES Readers, leave your email address (name [at] domainname [dot] com) along with your answer to the question for your chance to win a free autographed copy of the book featured above. If you do not answer the question, and your email address isn't provided, you will not be entered.

This week, the drawing is open to contiguous US residents for a print copy and international or Alaska/Hawaii residents for an eBook copy.

4 comments:

Sharon Srock said...

Amber, thanks so much for hosting me this week. I look forward to visiting with your readers.

windycindy said...

Lovely interview and a book that I would really enjoy reading and sharing! I used to have an imaginary
"Flea Circus", when I was young.
I would have a small bird cage and tell my friends about all the tricks my fleas were performing...
Many thanks, Cindi
jchoppes[at]hotmail[dot]com

Sharon Srock said...

If you aren't a writer, you probably should be with that sort of vivid imagination! So glad you stopped by. If and when you get the chance to read Terri's story, I'd love to hear your thoughts.

squiresj said...

Would love to be entered to win. No I don't have an imaginary friend.
jrs362 at hotmail dot com